Ethernet over Copper (otherwise known as EoC) service offers businesses in the United States a symmetric broadband connection to the Internet, and/or to a carrier backbone network, at speeds ranging from 2.0 Mbps to 75 Mbps. Unlike T1 service that is available practically everywhere, Ethernet over copper service has variable reach. The closer a customer is to the carrier’s central office (CO), the faster the connection is based on broadband speeds.

How does it work?

EoC runs over the copper pairs that every building has installed by the ILEC in the area, otherwise known as ‘the phone company’. These copper strands conduct electricity very well, but degrade as a function of distance. You will find EoC service in many areas across the country, typically your more populated zones. Suppliers typically invest in new EoC equipment where they can get the maximum return, which means they invest first in areas of high population density. But, over the years, suppliers have expanded EoC service out to the suburbs in search of new subscribers at reduced margins.